Legacy of the Prophet – An Explanation of Sunan Al Tirmidhi

I’ve decided to put all lectures from this series in one page, please click here to go to that page

From Wikipedia:

Abū ‘Īsá Muḥammad ibn ‛Īsá as-Sulamī aḍ-Ḍarīr al-Būghī at-Tirmidhī (Arabic: أبو عيسى محمد بن عيسى السلمي الضرير البوغي الترمذي‎; Persian: ترمذی‎, Termezī; 824 – 8 October 892), often referred to as Imam at-Tirmidhi, was a Persian[2][3] Islamic scholar and collector of hadith who wrote al-Jami` as-Sahih (known as Jami` at-Tirmidhi), one of the six canonical hadith compilations in Sunni Islam. He also wrote Shama’il Muhammadiyah (popularly known as Shama’il at-Tirmidhi), a compilation of hadiths concerning the person and character of the Islamic prophet, Muhammad. At-Tirmidhi was also well versed in Arabic grammar, favoring the school of Kufa over Basra due to the former’s preservation of Arabic poetry as a primary source.

Time is Abundant – Part 03 – Friday Khutbah – Joe Bradford

Time is Abundant – Part 03 – Friday Khutbah – Joe Bradford

The second in a series of Friday sermons about 103rd chapter of the Quran “By Time”
Listen to part 01 here
Listen to part 02 here

The 7 deadly sins ( Shirk, Magic, Murder, Riba, consuming wealth of orphans, turning back in warfare, and slandering pious women) are rooted in the need of control. Rather than relying on Allah and giving Him control in all matters, we believe control must be in our hands for us to benefit and feel secure. Ironically when we believe we are in control and securing ourselves we are actually losing baraka from Allah and will end up on the pathway to the 7 deadliest sins.

Shariah creeps onto the Washington Post (I keed)

A blog I read frequently, the Volokh Conspiracy (Eugene Volokh et al’s popular legal blog) has now moved to the Washington Post.

Volokh has serialized his article entitled “Religious Law (Especially Islamic Law) in American Courts, 66 Okla. L. Rev. 431 (2014)” for readers this week, which touches on broad aspects related to the compatibility between Islamic law and American law.

Reading this (generally very good) article, my first thought was that despite the author’s attempt to substantiate all his claims, some of them are still based on preconceived notions of what Shariah is without consideration for context and legal nuance. This to me means the door for more research and writing in the field.

My second thought was there is still a conflation of national laws and cultures with normative Islamic law by both Muslims and non-Muslims.

In the broadest sense possible, I touched on many of these topics in 2010 at a lecture hosted at Texas A&M University. You can watch it here: