Ten Tips for Muslims with Student Debt

mo_HGuest Post: Sh. Mohamed Hussein
Sh. Mohamed Hussein is a community leader in the greater DC metro area. 
A Hafiz of the Quran, he is also a graduate of the Islamic University of Medina in Hadith, George Mason University in Biology, and is a classically trained student of the Shafi’ school of Islamic law. Actively involved in youth outreach and community education, he currently serves as the youth director at Dar al Noor (MAV) in Manassas, Virginia. This article and the advice here hold a lot of weight due to Sh. Mohamed having both dealt with this issue personally and advised many of his siblings and peers on the subject matter.

 

Ten Tips for Muslims with Student Debt

As freshman commence their journeys, sophomores return for another year, juniors pray they can make it to senior year and seniors struggle with senioritis, it’s time for all of us to take a step back and learn so that gaining education doesn’t cost us the rest of our lives.

We must ask ourselves a few questions:

  • How do I avoid debt in general?
  • As a Muslim, how do you avoid incurring student loan debts?
  • Isn’t it too late? Shouldn’t I have been saving for the past 20 years?

These are all legitimate questions that we should genuinely be asking ourselves. For decades, Muslim students have been graduating and earning degrees from institutions of higher education and during this time they have witnessed the cost of education increase exponentially. Just speak to your parents. When they hear how much school is going to cost this upcoming year, they are baffled.

Read more

Congratulating each other at the commencement of Ramadan

Resurrected from the now defunct “Islamic Law, Etc.” blog, here is a post I made a long time ago about the permissibility of saying “Ramadan Mubarak.”

I felt there may be some benefit in it given Suhaib Webb’s recent article “Can We say Jumu’ah Mubarak” and some of the discussions surrounding it.

Enjoy.

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In the name of Allah, the Beneficent, the Merciful.

“Ramadan Mubaarak”

Every year Muslims all over the world wait in eagerness for the coming of the month of Ramadan. Ramadan, the month in which every night Allah has designated people to be freed from the hellfire, the month in which there is a night better than one thousand months, whoever fasts it with faith and reflection then all of his past sins will be forgiven.

Because of the status of this month and its importance, many of us greet each other in excitement with phrases such as “Ramadan Mubaarak” , “Ramadan Kareem”, “Kullu ‘aam wa antum bi khair” anticipating the great blessings of this month and wishing them for others.

Yet these phrases and greetings, even though we use them frequently, do they have a basis in our religion? Meaning: is there a precedent which has been set for such greetings? Read more

6 tips for job applications

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After reading this article about religion and job hiring, I’d like to share a few points about religion in the work place.

1- Don’t wear your religion on your sleeve and announce it as the only thing that defines you. MSA shows up on your resume, fine. Hijab, fine. Let your qualifications shine through.

So for example, an interviewer says “So, tell us about yourself”

BAD: “Well I’m a convert al-HUM-du-lillah…”
BAD: “I’m a Muslim, spirituality is SO important to me, I went on this Rihla and ehrmegerd. ..”
GOOD: “I was born and raised here in Anytown, USA. I’m a San Antonio Spurs fan, and Ive just finished an internship at a major industry player.”
You get the point.

2- Dont list your religion on your resume. And don’t lead with it in the phone convo or interview. No one cares really about that stuff when applying for a job. And don’t bring it up. They care if you are qualified not how many rakats you prayed last Ramadan.

3- Be cordial. They want a pleasant person to be around. If you are a jerk you probably won’t get hired, unless you are a total badass. If you are a badass, still be humble. That’s two things you’ve got going for you.

4- Be confident about your faith and identity but be private as well. Lead with stuff relevant to your experience. When religion comes up, if it does in your interview, control the situation. “Yes I feel I am a person of faith but I also believe faith is a private matter. I am more concerned about doing a good job and fulfilling my job requirements.”

5- Also, don’t make demands before you are fully hired. “Before you give me this baller 130k a yr job, realize that I’ll need every Friday off and a special room to pray in 5 times a day.” If you do that, they’ll find something to disqualify you for before you are ever hired.

6- You can still practice your faith, you dont have to comprimise. If you get hired on merit or good personality then go into the job and kick butt, you can easily say to your manager “hey do mind if I take a longer lunch on Friday? There is a service I’d like to attend and I’ll stay late or come in early to compensate. Rest assured if there’s an important team meeting then I’ll be here.”

All it takes is a little tact, humility, and confidence.

What are your experiences with applying for jobs?

Legacy of the Prophet – An Explanation of Sunan Al Tirmidhi

I’ve decided to put all lectures from this series in one page, please click here to go to that page

From Wikipedia:

Abū ‘Īsá Muḥammad ibn ‛Īsá as-Sulamī aḍ-Ḍarīr al-Būghī at-Tirmidhī (Arabic: أبو عيسى محمد بن عيسى السلمي الضرير البوغي الترمذي‎; Persian: ترمذی‎, Termezī; 824 – 8 October 892), often referred to as Imam at-Tirmidhi, was a Persian[2][3] Islamic scholar and collector of hadith who wrote al-Jami` as-Sahih (known as Jami` at-Tirmidhi), one of the six canonical hadith compilations in Sunni Islam. He also wrote Shama’il Muhammadiyah (popularly known as Shama’il at-Tirmidhi), a compilation of hadiths concerning the person and character of the Islamic prophet, Muhammad. At-Tirmidhi was also well versed in Arabic grammar, favoring the school of Kufa over Basra due to the former’s preservation of Arabic poetry as a primary source.

Time is Abundant – Part 03 – Friday Khutbah – Joe Bradford

Time is Abundant – Part 03 – Friday Khutbah – Joe Bradford

The second in a series of Friday sermons about 103rd chapter of the Quran “By Time”
Listen to part 01 here
Listen to part 02 here

The 7 deadly sins ( Shirk, Magic, Murder, Riba, consuming wealth of orphans, turning back in warfare, and slandering pious women) are rooted in the need of control. Rather than relying on Allah and giving Him control in all matters, we believe control must be in our hands for us to benefit and feel secure. Ironically when we believe we are in control and securing ourselves we are actually losing baraka from Allah and will end up on the pathway to the 7 deadliest sins.